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The Relationship Between Sugar, Carbs and Diabetes

Did you know that people with diabetes can still enjoy moderate amounts of carbohydrates in their diets? As the body's preferred energy source, carbohydrates should make up roughly half of your daily calorie intake. But how do carbs and insulin impact each other? And what precautions should someone with diabetes take when it comes to their diet? Continue reading to learn about the connection between carbs and diabetes and find out how Sweet Defeat can help you reduce your sugar intake.

How the Body Digests Carbohydrates?

As the saying goes, "Everything in moderation." The same phrase can be applied to a diabetic's carbohydrates intake. Rather than cut carbs altogether, people with diabetes can still enjoy a moderate amount.

Carbohydrates are the starches and sugars found in grains, starchy vegetables, fruit, milk and sweets. When we eat carbs, our digestive systems break down digestible carbs into sugar, which enters the bloodstream. Once blood sugar levels increase, the pancreas produces insulin — a hormone that makes cells absorb blood sugar for energy. The levels of blood sugar in the bloodstream begin to fall as cells absorb it. As this happens, the pancreas makes glucagon — a hormone that makes the liver release stored sugar. By working together, insulin and glucagon ensure cells throughout the body have a stable amount of blood sugar.

Carbs and Diabetes

So, where does diabetes come into play? Carbohydrate metabolism plays a crucial role in the development of type 2 diabetes. Typically developing over a number of years, type 2 diabetes occurs when the body can't create enough insulin or can't properly use the insulin it creates. When the body experiences insulin resistance, blood sugar and insulin levels stay high long after eating. As time passes, stress on the insulin-making cells causes them to become worn out, and insulin production stops.

Understanding this connection between carbs and insulin makes it easier to maintain a healthy diet. Whether you're a diabetic or simply looking to eat a balanced diet, controlling the amount of carbs you consume can be a beneficial approach.

Eating Foods That Won't Raise Your Blood Sugar

What can you eat that won't raise your blood sugar? A great option is foods with less than 20 calories and 5 grams of carbohydrates. These often consist of sugar-free beverages, sodas, spices and seasonings. Make sure to read nutrition labels — not all "low-carb" and "no-sugar-added" foods are necessarily low in calories or carbohydrate-free.

Carbs and Diabetes FAQs

So, where does diabetes come into play? Carbohydrate metabolism plays a crucial role in the development of type 2 diabetes. Typically developing over a number of years, type 2 diabetes occurs when the body can't create enough insulin or can't properly use the insulin it creates. When the body experiences insulin resistance, blood sugar and insulin levels stay high long after eating. As time passes, stress on the insulin-making cells causes them to become worn out, and insulin production stops.

Is Insulin a Carbohydrate?

While insulin isn't a carbohydrate, it does get produced by the pancreas when the body digests carbs. Carbohydrates tend to raise insulin levels in your blood. As a protein, the purpose of insulin is to ensure cells absorb sugar for energy.

Is Glucose a Carbohydrate?

Yes, glucose is known as a simple carbohydrate. Composed of sugars like fructose and glucose, simple carbohydrates have chemical structures composed of only one sugar (monosaccharides) or two sugars (disaccharides.)

What is Carbohydrate Counting?

Carbohydrate counting is an effective approach that helps you evenly distribute your carbohydrate calories on a daily basis. It involves calculating the right amount of carbohydrate foods for each meal and snack you consume.

This meal planning tactic can take place in counting grams of carbohydrates or carbohydrate choices. One carbohydrate choice is the equivalent of 15 grams of carbs. Examples include one small apple, one slice of bread or one cup of milk.

What is Sugar Counting?

Contrary to popular belief, sugar doesn't raise blood sugar levels any more than starches do. As a result, it's important to monitor your sugar intake and count sugary foods as part of your total carbohydrate consumption.

It's important to note that foods high in sugar are often high in fat and calories. If those foods are eaten in excess, they may elevate sugar and triglyceride levels. This can lead to weight gain, which is linked to diabetes. Ultimately, monitoring your sugar intake is a wise method for preventing diabetes or relieving symptoms.

Fight Off Your Sugar Cravings with Sweet Defeat

Whether you're looking to monitor your carbs and insulin or lose weight on a no-sugar diet, Sweet Defeat is here to help. Our clinically-proven formula can help temporarily block sugar's taste, so you can combat your cravings and keep your blood sugar at a moderate level. To experience the benefits of a reduced-sugar diet, shop our Sweet Defeat supplements today!

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